Lost & Found

Lost & Found
Lovely Puss Puss

Lovely Puss Puss

You are probably reading this page because you have lost your cat or found a stray cat. If this is the case, please select the appropriate link aside and you may find suggestions to help you. You can also report the cat using the contact form under the lost and found pages aside. If you haven’t lost a cat, and you’re simply browsing the site, please note the following recommendations we make to ensure that you keep your cat safe.

Have your cat micro-chipped. This is as important for “indoor only” cats as for cats who are allowed outside, as if an indoor-only cat manages to get outside it will immediately be on “foreign territory” and won’t have any knowledge of how to get back inside. Remember to update the details if you move house.  This article alerts you to the risks of not micro-chipping your cat.

Put a collar on your cat with your name and address on the tag (we don’t recommend “barrel” or screw-on tags, as these can easily become unattached). Again this is as important for “indoor only” cats as for cats who are allowed outside, as of course indoor only cats will be on unfamiliar territory the minute they go outside. We recommend safety-release collars.

All kittens are neutered before they leave us

All kittens are neutered before they leave us

Have your cat neutered.  Even if the cat is to be an indoor only cat, this is important. Tom cats will wander to find queens to mate with, and will eventually become lost; female cats will stop at nothing to get out once they come into season, and again may become lost.  If your cat remains un-neutered and is not allowed out, he or she may become aggressive due to the need to mate coupled with the inability to do so.  Un-neutered and un-mated female cats are at risk of pyometra (infection of the womb), which can be fatal if not treated.  If you really want to have kittens, why not approach your local rescue and offer to foster a litter until they are big enough to go to new homes – it will help you appreciate the hard work involved!

If your cat is elderly or very thin due to a medical condition, put a collar on him with a note to that effect. Many well-meaning people have taken in “starving strays” who are in fact well-loved and cared for cats, who are receiving regular medication.

Take plenty of photos of your cat.  As well as photos of her face, take photos of her back, sides and even tummy. It will help with identifying the cat if she does become lost.

New arrivals

New arrivals

If you move house, keep your cat in for at least a fortnight, and then gradually let him out under supervision in calm weather.  Ensure that collars and microchip details are updated before you let him out.  For the days surrounding the actual move, consider putting your cat in a cattery – it will help avoid all the stress caused by the noise and bustle as furniture is taken in and out.

If there are any major changes in your house – a new arrival (even just an overnight visitor) for example, or even new furniture or a loud party, keep the cat in for a little while and again supervise her when she goes out.